Training LIS Students and New Librarians for Careers in Instruction

When:  Mar 6, 2019 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM

2-Session Event

Teaching and presentation skills are crucial in librarianship, and many new librarians can feel uncertain in these roles due to no formal training.  It’s important to help LIS students and new librarians develop these skills in order that they feel comfortable running a classroom and presenting to different departments across campus.

Based on their ACRL book The Craft of Librarian Instruction: Using Acting Techniques to Create Your Teaching Presence, join Julie Artman, Jeff Sundquist, and Doug Dechow for a fun and creative approach to teaching library instruction and presentation. Acting techniques can help you and your mentees hone your presentation skills, your teaching style, and your performance to create an invigorating (and stress-free) learning experience for your students. This special 2-part series will provide practical and teachable approaches for librarian faculty of library and information science students, or librarians mentoring new librarians, to help you prepare them to succeed in their future careers as instruction librarians.

Limited seating - priority will be given to SEFLIN members.  If your library is not a member of SEFLIN and you do not have an individual SEFLIN account please create an account at seflin.org.  Individuals need to FIRST have a SEFLIN account to then register on the wait-list HERE.  (Please make sure you refresh your browser after opening an account.)  We will grant first come first serve access if seats remain available. 

Learning Outcomes

Through the use of acting methods and techniques, participants will learn how to:

PART I: Preparing New Instructors for the Stage (60 minutes)

Rehearse and prepare library and information science students or new librarians for future careers as instruction librarians by honing individual presentation styles through the use of acting techniques, including visualization, memorization, and improvisation; and
Engage and connect library and information science students or new librarians in the instruction arena to their student audience through personalization and role-playing, and by exploring teacher identity.

PART II: Teaching Presence and Intentional Instruction (60 minutes)

Sharpen your library and information science students’ or new librarians’ unique teaching presence through reflection and intentional instruction; and
Question and Answer wrap-up with case studies and sample syllabi.

Who Should Attend

Teaching faculty of library and information science students; librarians mentoring new instruction librarians; any librarian who wants to reduce stage fright and gain increased comfort in front of audiences; library managers and administrators.

About the Presenters

Julie Artman has worked as a theatre director, producer, acting coach, and actor in New York City, Los Angeles, and regionally. Currently, Julie is Chair of Collection Management at Leatherby Libraries, Chapman University, and teaches in the Department of Theatre. Julie’s next book will explore the nature of acting through the interplay of mindfulness teachings and practices.

Jeff Sundquist is Assistant Dean for Research and Collections at Florida Atlantic University. After earning a BA in Theater at UCLA, he stayed to pursue an MLIS and MA in Scandinavian Studies concurrently, the latter degree hinging tightly on the works of Ibsen and Strindberg. Jeff is working on a new book about the theatrical reception of Norwegian playwright Jon Fosse.

Douglas R. Dechow (PhD, MSLIS) is the Digital Humanities and Sciences Librarian at Leatherby Libraries, Chapman University and the Director of Digital Projects for Chapman University's Center for American War Letters. Doug is co-author or co-editor of a number of books, including Generation Space: A Love Story (2017), The Craft of Librarian Instruction: Using Acting Techniques to Create Your Teaching Presence (2016), Intertwingled: The Work and Influence of Ted Nelson (2015), and Squeak: A Quick Trip to ObjectLand (2002), a Smalltalk programming language textbook.

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